My 95 Neon Project Thread

Do you have a project going or will you be starting a project here very soon and just want to keep a log of everything you and when? Share with everyone every step of the way what sort of progress you are making on your project.
Doug95neon
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Posts: 68
Joined: Sat May 30, 2009 8:42 pm
Location: Morrisville, NC

My 95 Neon Project Thread

Post by Doug95neon » Sun May 31, 2009 2:30 pm

Here's basically a cut and paste from another thread I made for the neon. It turned in to an intro thread in to a project thread I just added on. You may run across a few editing glitches but you'll get the jest of things.

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Battery Relocation Kit with 100 amp circuit breaker on Battery's left.

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It's not how you drive your car but how you stand by it.... errr um...

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Stock struts are bad MMMMkkay?

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Nice clean engine bay, no dumb wire loom to confuse the eye holes.

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2g manifold, SRT-4 Cat-Back

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From the rear.

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Tucked nicely in place.

Mod List:
Going in through the poor man's cold air intake.
Controlled air flow by 57mm throttle body.
Port-matched intake on the cylinder head says "Welcome!"
Three Angle Valve job says hurry up and get in while the Crane Springs and Titanium retainers keep tight control over the revolving door of aspiration.
The Crane Cam says bring more of your friends and stay a while longer.
AEM Cam gear allows some discretion as to when they come and go.
The milled head helps to keep the crowd tightly packed in.
Port-matched exhaust ports in the head say "It's time to go, don't linger."

Easing the exit of this fine establishment you'll find a 2g neon exhaust manifold mating up to the still-green-friendly SRT-4 Catalytic converter.
Past that it's a smooth ride through the rest of the factory SRT-4 Exhaust.
Keeping the oil from becoming a Frothy Brew is a mopar Windage tray.

Adequate spark is insured both Mopar performance wires getting shocked by a screamin' Demon Coil.

All this would be pointless with a stock computer so I tried on the Mopar Performance SOHC computer... I think I'll keep it :)

Keeping the ride planted:
Mopar High Rate springs help to lower the center of gravity and get rid of some squishy. KYB GR-2s.... well... I should have left them in the warehouse and gotten the Konis or AGXs. Oh well... I've got to have SOMETHING to do this winter right?
Poly-Urethane bushings help some with the squish
Making sure that the turns can be taken faster you'll find a nicely bent Mopar Performance 22mm sway bars front AND rear.
Helping that frame to stay in shape we've got a set of cheap-@$$ front and rear strut tower braces.
On the bit unusual side you'll find a rear trailer hitch. Actually ties up the rear nicely like a lower tie-bar of sorts.

Directly above the rear exhaust section you'll find an Optima Red Top in the Boot. Keeping the factory installed smoke in place, the 100 amp circuit breaker right at the battery is a nice safety feature.

Of course... if you've got a slipping clutch none of this matters so let's keep that from happening with a Mopar Performance Clutch. And you might be able to keep that axle from breaking for a third time with a nice yellow-booted Fidanza axle. Of course... if I had the urethane motor mount inserts in BEFORE I went to the drag strip then I wouldn't know how 2 $100.00 tow bills felt. So... the lesson? Don't go to the drag strip and get used to the teeth chattering from the inserts.

For the autocross you'll find some 15x7 KMC wheels transferring all this MAD POWA... cough cough... to the ground by way of some 225/50ZR15 Kumho Victoracers. Never mind the rubbing, MORE GAS!!!

Attitude of these wheels are kept in check with the help of some "crash bolts" allowing camber adjustment. Meanwhile, the car gets pointed where I tell it thanks to the faster 16:1 ACR steering rack.

Well, that's it. I've got a few things on the short term wish list like Depos (which should I get? Also will be getting a short throw and booger bushings. An AFC would probably be in the mix as well.

Long Term plans will be Koni's and a bottom end Rebuild with 10.5+ compression components. That would probably do it for this ride. I'll enjoy it, hopefully, for another three or four years and then find a new car to beat on.
Doug
Raleigh, NC

Videos:
http://youtube.com/watch?v=c36F-kdGz64
Audio

http://youtube.com/watch?v=CQ88mSBm7Nc
http://youtube.com/watch?v=iwl-vEVcjS0
Tail of the Dragon, Deals Gap, Border TN/NC two years ago.

More Pics:

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I stayed at a Holiday Inn Express last night, I HAVE to be right.

My Project thread: Here

Doug95neon
1GN Registrant
Posts: 68
Joined: Sat May 30, 2009 8:42 pm
Location: Morrisville, NC

Post by Doug95neon » Sun May 31, 2009 2:32 pm

This stuff's about a month old now:

So... I spent a number of hours working on the car today with the help of Mark of Performance Chassis here in Cary, NC as well as my buddy Mike, a fellow neon enthusiast (WickedGoodNeon). I started around lunch time and well, I'm tired and wore out. I'm a little behind schedule as I was hoping to have all the parts on the car and it at least sitting on the ground ready to be moved to the alignment rack. Instead we were able to get all the coil-overs hung and all of the rear suspension is in place ready to be lowered and torqued. Mike was able to get the front struts hung while I worked on the total PITA task referred to as front control arm bushing removal/modifying/installation.

So here's the car as the day began. Mopar High rate springs which lowered the car about 1.5 inches all around whose movement was slowed by some KYB GR2's. Good street struts but not much above stock replacement when it comes to performance. The car:
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Nicely lowered, acceptable ride quality but could be a bit smoother as far as the struts and springs. However, my big gripe right now is horrible torque steer from moderate throttle input to decel as well as quirkiness when taking turns spirited. By quirky I mean it has a certain speed, throttle input, degree of turning you can take and feel fine. But beyond that sweet spot it feels unstable and honestly unpredictable. As you read on you'll see why I think.

The car has an independent rear suspension. Two lateral links run from the center of the rear frame down to each knuckle. There is a third arm that runs from the bottom of the knuckle to the chassis (fore and aft) which is referred to a tension strut (or something like that, I'll edit this once I bring my books home). Each link has two bushings and at each end there's a really long bolt that goes through the links and the knuckle OR the links and the chassis subframe. The tension strut has a bushing on each side of the knuckle and on each side of a subframe bracket, shown below:
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These long bolts tend to be problematic for those doing alignments or upgrades. They rust on the ends with the threads making it difficult to remove for bushing/link service but also the shaft of the bolt rusts which causes it not to want to spin in order to loosen for alignment. On the hex shaped washer, only found on the inner bolts, rear subframe side, there is a tab. This tab is used to shift the lateral link inward or outward as it rotates. What this does is cause the toe setting to change depending on where you leave the tab. When this bolt is rusted up spinning can not only be difficult but unpredictable and rough making it difficult to make minute adjustments smoothly. If you take the bolt to the bench grinder with a wire wheel clean off the rust from the threads and the shaft. A small amount of anti-seize smeared on the threads and shaft can help keep things moving. A small amount on the head of the bolt and tabbed washer will ease in the alignment now and in the future.

The kit I bought is made by Energy Suspension. It's pretty nice though there was a problem or two we ran in to. One metal sleeve for these rear links was not right so we ended up having it machined down to match the rest:
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Use of a vise and a shop press was crucial to removing and installing the bushings and sleeves without damaging the components:
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The kit came with a number of flat washers. These are used at the lateral links in addition to reusing the factory ones. The proper configuration of the hardware is shown in the paperwork that comes with the kit but here's a picture of the center link hardware in place:
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The larger hex nut acts as a washer, you have the rear bushing, the link, the front bushing, a washer and then the nut.

Here's a picture of me doing things wrong:
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I failed to put a washer between the link and the knuckle. This will cause increased wear on the bushing as well as undesirable deflection because the washer will actually hold it in place. Attention to detail will make a big difference as I will show you how I messed up a few years ago with some front suspension urethane bushing installs gone wrong. Also, take a look at the egg shaped hole made by the tension strut rod at the knuckle. The hole on the opposite side is still nearly perfectly round while the rear side is shot. This would lead me to believe that the knuckle actually had caster changes happening on the fly. Meaning, the top of the knuckle was moving clockwise and counterclockwise as viewed from the side of the car. New bushings are perfectly round and should keep my alignment in check both sitting still as well as on course.

The new struts fit real well though the hats can only go in one way. There are four studs on the hat and two of them are off-centered.
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If you'll notice I am reusing the stock nuts w/washers for the struts. The reason being is that the ones that came with the BC Coil-Overs have little to no collar on them. The larger collar means that more of the load is spread out preventing the stud and nut from sheering off.

The stock struts and Mopar High Rates have served me well but if I'm going to be more competitive in the Street Modified class then I've got to maximize the car's potential as well as my options for mods:
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So that's pretty much the extent of the work for the rear of the car. The assembly process was rather smooth with the help of air tools, a two post lift and help from Mark and Mike. Thanks for putting up with me
I stayed at a Holiday Inn Express last night, I HAVE to be right.

My Project thread: Here

Doug95neon
1GN Registrant
Posts: 68
Joined: Sat May 30, 2009 8:42 pm
Location: Morrisville, NC

Post by Doug95neon » Sun May 31, 2009 2:34 pm

On to the front suspension work. It was a total douche to deal with once you get the parts off the car. I spent the vast majority of the afternoon grinding away on my lower control arms because of the particular kit that I chose to use. Note to those running in specific SCCA style classes, modifications like what I'm doing to this control arm can be considered illegal in some classes. So the bushing upgrade may not change your class but the arm modification might bump you up.

So... as you can see by the date stamps on many of these posts I've been working on this project for a number of years. In that time I've gotten better and more educated (looking back I was pretty stupid then). In my infinite stupidity I didn't know all the details of the front control arm bushing installation process that were required and as an end result my car now rides like ass. What am I talking about?? Well, urethane bushings shouldn't look like this:
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Or this:
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Or this:
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Why not? 'Cause you're supposed to measure:
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And Grind:
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And Grind:
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And Grind:
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In the above picture you can just barely see where the rust ends and the sleeve was recessed in the arm preventing rust. There is ONE bushing that goes with this particular arm and ONLY in this particular position. It looks just like the other three bushings but it has a groove cut in it to accept that sleeve. You have to press that sleeve out of the way, grind on it and then press the sleeve back in.

Here's that special bushing:
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And Grind some more:
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In that picture above I'm comparing the stock arm from one side to the opposite side which I've already done some grinding on. All in all I had to grind the control arm anywhere from 4 to 8 millimeters depending on which portion I was working on.

This grinding is crucial for this bushing kit because it makes the arm the right thickness to match the bushing going in those wholes. If you look at the instructions they will basically tell you that the arms have to be within a certain range of thickness as shown in the picture with me measuring the arm. The measurement needs to be split in half and you grind evenly from both sides of the arm for the part that goes in to the subframe at the rear (the curved section). The straight part of the arm you only have to grind on one side. But you have to get your measurements on the money or else you'll cut off to much and have to get another control arm and start over again.

Properly installed bushings will look like this:
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So in the morning I've got to grind the other arm down and install the bushings. THEN... I can get back to the fun part of actually installing parts on the car as well as doing the corner weighting w/ride height adjustment and finally the alignment. Wish me luck.
Doug
I stayed at a Holiday Inn Express last night, I HAVE to be right.

My Project thread: Here

Doug95neon
1GN Registrant
Posts: 68
Joined: Sat May 30, 2009 8:42 pm
Location: Morrisville, NC

Post by Doug95neon » Sun May 31, 2009 2:35 pm

Yeah... so you know how there's some modifications you've done at home where you lack many of the tools and shop equipment needed to to speed things up and make life easy? Do you remember that feeling you had when the whole thing was said and done but you were so wiped out that you felt like calling in dead on Monday? Only imagine being that guy who DID have all the right tools and the lifts, and the helpers, and air tools and STILL feeling beat down like Nancy Kerrigan. That... was me.

The modifications to the suspension went smoother on Sunday than the day before. I knew the task at hand and brought a few extra things from home to accomplish those steps. I got a little grinder happy but not by much so hopefully things will work out on the RF lower control arm.

The reason why we grind the control arms with this particular kit is because of the gap here:
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If you don't grind what you end up with is this:
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The metal sleeve does not contact the subframe as it needs to like this:
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And you end up tightening the bolt/nut and crushing the bushing rather than stopping on the sleeve.
On the rear part of the front arm the bushing looks like this:
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Although you can see a little gap on the top side between the arm and the bushing where I got a little crazy grinding on it. All in all though the bushings sit nicely in there and I hope not to have egg shaped bushings in another 4 years.


In this picture below you can see that I have ground the crap out of the arm. It's just about ready to go on but installing the bushing now would create problems. Where I was grinding, excess material has rolled in to the opening. It's pretty sharp and not only will cut you but also the bushing. Take a file (round worked well) and grind that out making a slight taper to ease installation. Also, all of that rusty buildup needs to be cleaned out or else you'll not be able to get the new bushing in and have it sit right.
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Note: ONLY GRIND ONE OF THESE ARMS LIKE THIS. Both arms have metal sleeves in them but only one arm has a sleeve that extends outward. That takes the special bushing and special grinding process.


So with the front suspension all put back together I'm ready to go over to the alignment rack for all the technical mumbo jumbo.
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First, let me thank Jim Leonard for helping me out a lot on Sunday with the corner weighting and moral support.

We set the car on the rack, raised it, put the corner weights under the wheels and then roll it backwards off the scales on these wooden blocks. We turn on the scales and zero them out then roll the car back on to them.

The car without my slim self weighs 2395 lbs. Add me to the mix and it goes up to 2618 ( I know, I'm going on a diet next week).
LF 824 lbs....^^^....RF 795 lbs......Front....1619 lbs
LR 529 lbs...............RR 470 lbs.....Rear.......999 lbs

So with the ride height where I wanted it the balance is pretty close side to side as well as cross. There's more weight on the front but it's front wheel drive meaning you WANT it there to keep weight on the wheels and the weight is there because of the engine and transmission.

With corner weighting done we moved on to alignment which took me WAY too long but I finally got it in the ball park to drive home on. The rear was a total nightmare because of the crappy design used for toe adjustment. As I explained in the previous posting you'll remember that there's a hex washer with a tab on it used to adjust rear toe on the lateral link. Well, it had plenty of range it was just too far out to start with to get where I wanted. Basically I wanted rear toe to be set to zero degrees. Meaning they are pointing straight ahead and not trying to steer the rear end in any direction. Normal range of motion would be say... +0.40 degrees to -0.40 degrees. Well, my range of adjustment was +1.10 to +0.30 degrees. I still had the same range it was just pushing the front of my tires in to the tension strut.
Here is one of my many attempts at getting the tie right:
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Mike and I spent a couple of hours installing and reinstalling the rear suspension with little success. Finally I ended up taking a pry bar that's about 4 feet long and prying the crap out of the rear knuckle (see the bolt at the knuckle, picture a pry bar in in the same manor extending to the rear of the car, now push towards the license plate) to basically pre-load the lateral links. This is a HORRIBLE thing to do because it binds things up but... you do what you have to do when you're running out of time.

So, knowing that I had the toe back in the range I needed it I set the rear camber to negative 0.5 degrees. That's not a lot of camber but I was only planning on running about negative 1.5 degrees up front so that combination had worked fine for me last year. I finally got rear toe set to 0.00 degrees and had just enough clearance between the front of the tire and the tension strut.

On to the front. Toe was not going to be an issue thanks to a recently upgraded New ACR Rack. Camber was a bit messier. The spring perches prevented too much lean on the top but I thought the camber plates would give me the extra camber I needed. So we loosened the knuckle to strut bolts and set the camber using a wrench between the tire and the strut.
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Rear camber on the lower end now maxed out I go up top and loosen the retaining bolts for the plate to shift. The camber at that point was positive 0.3 degrees.
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Hhhhhhmmm.... I'm not sitting the same distance from zero only on the negative side. Max negative camber of -0.3 degrees??? Well, if you look at the last picture really good you'll see that the inner bolt (both) are touching the collar of the strut seat. Thoroughly wore out and frustrated by previous alignment woes I left the camber there and set the toe so I could at least drive it home.

Little did I know that there was a second set of holes you could use to gain even more negative camber. When you're burned out you don't see what's right in front of you.

Stay tuned for a summary of ride quality and other things I'll be working on to get the suspension tuned to it's best.
Doug
I stayed at a Holiday Inn Express last night, I HAVE to be right.

My Project thread: Here

Doug95neon
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Posts: 68
Joined: Sat May 30, 2009 8:42 pm
Location: Morrisville, NC

Post by Doug95neon » Sun May 31, 2009 2:39 pm

Posted between suspension work being completed:

I thought I didn't have my hands full enough as it was so I started another project on the car before finishing the last one. For this one I REALLY have to turn back time and refresh some memories.

I bought the car for $300.00 because of numerous problems of which a no-start condition was one of them. The factory harness had melted together due to oil saturation from the head gasket leak. A new crank sensor and a quick wiring repair put the car back in the driveable condition though the headgasket was still leaking. After doing a bunch of other stuff to it over the next couple of months I developed an injector wiring issue. I again patched the harness and went on my marry way. Well, one thing led to another and I ended up needing a different injector wiring repair and decided I had patched things together one too many times and I'd just get a new harness.

As most of you know I'm pretty thorough and try to do right, the first time, so as not to have to do over later. Well... I'm doing over. In my quest for speed I upgraded to a second generation neon exhaust manifold. Longer runners, better flowing and bolts right up to the SRT-4 cat and cat-back. In my haste for speed I didn't put any heat shields back on it. After a couple of years my NEW harness now behaves like the old. The car cuts out from time to time, lights kinda flicker and well, it's all but impossible to pin point what's going on but when you see a problem you fix it.
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I had noticed a few weeks ago that the section of wiring on the back side of the block wasn't looking so swift. I already had a number of plans in the works and thought I could get through those before addressing the wiring. After the suspension work this week the neon became more and more difficult to keep running, stalling out at stop lights and foot-off-throttle conditions, headlights flickering and finally it popped my 100 amp circuit breaker at the battery. Enough is enough, another brand new harness came in today and the old is off the car.

Even Dakota isn't happy with my laziness:
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In the section of wiring that's partially fused together is the crank sensor circuitry, altenator circuitry including large gauge wire leading to battery +, both o2 sensors, oil pressure sending unit and the vehicle speed sensor. Basically, a lot of stuff that can directly affect keeping the car running.

I'll swap out some connectors on the new harness tomorrow (some newer sensors required a connector upgrade) and hopefully be back on the road tomorrow night.
Doug
I stayed at a Holiday Inn Express last night, I HAVE to be right.

My Project thread: Here

Doug95neon
1GN Registrant
Posts: 68
Joined: Sat May 30, 2009 8:42 pm
Location: Morrisville, NC

Post by Doug95neon » Sun May 31, 2009 2:41 pm

Post is about three weeks ago:
Well, I finally finished the Neon suspension upgrade today with some more parts, more adjustments and more kicking myself for one bad choice of suspension parts that has affected EVERY aspect of this job.

After I finished working on the car last weekend I wasn't happy with a few things. Clearance has been an issue at all for corners since I put these parts on where as prior to them I had just enough room to not be worried about it. My biggest problem has been lack of clearance at the rear tire to tension strut seen here:
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A dislike has been the clearance issue at the top of the front tires to the new coil over setup seen here:
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The front is tolerable as it simple does not given me the camber setting I want but the rear is clearly is an issue since the tension strut is contacting the tire.

To combat this issue I bought some different lateral links manufactured by SPC. The arms do away with the obnoxious toe adjuster at the middle of the rear and instead uses two turnbuckle style sleeves. Buying one set of arms will allow for rear toe adjustment. Buying two sets of arms allows for rear camber and toe adjustment from these arms and then on top of that I've got slotted and excentric adjustments at the knuckles. The arms are shown here:
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After getting these new lateral links on the car we went ahead and rolled the fenders because I was having clearance issues when the rear dropped down from speed bumps and such. My helper today was Fred who was really helpful and taught me a few tricks. Of which was matching up the new lateral links with the old by using the bolts and old links shown here:
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Fred is a smart guy and since I didn't have any experience with the the fender roller I thought it was best to get some help with the project.
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Rolling the fenders is not difficult at all with the right tool but you should be aware that you may cause the paint to crack. The older a car gets the less flexible the paint becomes. Throw in a car that didn't have a lot of flex agent in it from the start and you're going to get some cracking. Here's the unrolled right rear:
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Compared to the rolled left side:
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and here:
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The focus wasn't working with me on the last shot but you can see that it's tucked quite a bit back which gave me the clearance I needed.

With the fenders rolled, the lateral links installed and the wheels back on the car I still had some clearance issues at the tension strut so I made some less than desirable changes to one side. I slotted the bracket that holds the tension strut to the chassis:
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I didn't find this to be a really offensive modification but I would suggest making sure the bolts are good and tight as well as maybe tack welding the bracket in two or three places just to make sure it doesn't move (this will cause the rear toe to move outboard if it moves).

Clearance still wasn't great but it's manageable. On my street tires and wheels I have plenty of clearance but the race setup isn't so swift.

After I got things acceptable I went back and aligned the car. Wow... what a difference these new rear lateral links make in the adjustability of camber and toe. It's so nice for camber to be a one man job now and pulling and pushing on the top of the tire is no longer needed. The parts move freely and easily making adjustment pretty short order.

On the front I found that there was a second set of bolt holes for the inner bolts. Relocate the inner bolts to these holes and you end up getting more negative camber adjustment.
Compare previous:
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Second settings:
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So with room for more negative camber up front I dropped the camber from -0.3 from last weekend to -1.1. Reset front toe and I'm done.

Alignment settings were as follows:

Left front camber -1.1*.....^.....Right Front Camber -1.1*
Left Front Toe....-0.05*............Right Front Toe....-0.08*
Left Rear Camber .-0.8*............Right Rear Camber..-0.8*
Left Rear Toe.....-0.02*.....^.....Right Rear Toe.....-0.02*

So the toe on the front and rear is really touchy. Take the car off the lift and put it back on and you get different toe readings on any car. Camber doesn't move so much but I got the front and rear where I want it. The rear tires are near zero degrees which means they simply follow the front. Rear camber leans in a little more which means the back stays planted. Less camber in the back will cause the car to snap-oversteer which is hard to control. Too much negative camber causes the car to not turn. Refer back to the Laurinburg (Read more here:http://www.carolinadsm.com/forum/showthread.php?t=14434) adventures to see what happened with no rear camber.

The front is cambered in close to what I wanted which keeps it planted real well. Push the front toe outboard and you get a car that turns real quick but is a little unstable when dealing with the road crown. I can deal with it.

The biggest problem I have with the whole car deals with my wheel offset. If I had actually done some research when I bought my neon years back I would have seen that the offset wasn't right. As a result I cannot max out my front camber like most guys with as much adjustment as I have. The rear tension strut clearance issue again is due to wheel offset even though I'm running spacers on the rear. Buy the right wheel, the first time, and things will fit like they're supposed to.

Be that as it may the overall modification of the suspension went well enough. A number of hickups along the way but the work really paid off. The car sits lower in the back, the fenders no longer scrub and the car has all the suspension work done to it known to the car gods. Spring rate and wheel clearance are about the only things left to dabble with.

The ride is kinda rough, much like the Mopar High Rate springs on the KYB GR2 struts but it's not a caddy by any means. The car stays planted. It takes turns like it's riding on rails. It will out handle MANY cars on the road and you can have all the power in the world but if the suspension isn't in check you're just going to lose control.

I look forward to the autocross season this year in hopes to improve my placement in the classes. Hopefully all the work will pay off as I continue to improve the car as well as my driving skills. That's going to be it for upgrades for a while but stay tuned for details about how the racing season progresses. Thanks for reading and happy tuning!
Doug

Sometimes you forget the important stuff. I've been talking about Performance Chassis of Cary off and on but I really do appreciate the all the help the folks up there have been from start to finish with this project. If you're in North Carolina I strongly recomend these guys for all your suspension work. Without their insight and the high end equipment they use the neon would still be squishy and unpredictable. Thanks Again Mark, Fred and Jim.
Performance-Chassis.com
Cary, NC
919-466-0553
I stayed at a Holiday Inn Express last night, I HAVE to be right.

My Project thread: Here

Doug95neon
1GN Registrant
Posts: 68
Joined: Sat May 30, 2009 8:42 pm
Location: Morrisville, NC

Post by Doug95neon » Sun May 31, 2009 2:43 pm

Here's some pictures of the final product. I got in some new autocross magnets this weekend from Micheal Keogh. Information about getting your own event magnets can be found here:
http://forums.neons.org/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=340834

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I stayed at a Holiday Inn Express last night, I HAVE to be right.

My Project thread: Here

Doug95neon
1GN Registrant
Posts: 68
Joined: Sat May 30, 2009 8:42 pm
Location: Morrisville, NC

Post by Doug95neon » Sun May 31, 2009 2:44 pm

Alignment settings were as follows:

Left front camber -1.1*.....^.....Right Front Camber -1.1*
Left Front Toe....-0.05*............Right Front Toe....-0.08*
Left Rear Camber .-0.8*............Right Rear Camber..-0.8*
Left Rear Toe.....-0.02*.....^.....Right Rear Toe.....-0.02*


The struts are slotted front and rear. I set them in at that point as far negative as the tire-spring perch clearence could tolerate. That gave me a maximum negative camber of -0.5 degrees. After I noticed the second set of holes in the struts for more negative camber I moved the bolts and leaned the camber in to -1.1 degrees.

It's a combination of the width of the tire that I'm running as well as the offset of the wheel that prevents more negative camber at the knuckle/strut position. I think I could run an additional -1.0 degrees once I change offset.
D
I stayed at a Holiday Inn Express last night, I HAVE to be right.

My Project thread: Here

Doug95neon
1GN Registrant
Posts: 68
Joined: Sat May 30, 2009 8:42 pm
Location: Morrisville, NC

Post by Doug95neon » Sun May 31, 2009 2:45 pm

Event was Memorial Day:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RnMXKb0Q498

Video of Monday's autox. I only got one run in and parked it due to some troubles but that one run was good enough to nab a second place finish and get a trophy.
I stayed at a Holiday Inn Express last night, I HAVE to be right.

My Project thread: Here

Doug95neon
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Posts: 68
Joined: Sat May 30, 2009 8:42 pm
Location: Morrisville, NC

Post by Doug95neon » Sun May 31, 2009 2:47 pm

I had two problems, one of which is fixed the other is still a bit of a mystery at this point.

The first problem I noticed was that my oil separator didn't do such a wonderful job separating the oil from crank case pressure and pushed out quite a bit on to my transmission. Being a 95, it's got that crankcase breather assembly under the intake manifold which feeds in to the PCV valve and pulls air in from the factory air tube leading to the throttle body. Since I'm running the poor-man's-cold-air-intake that fresh air inlet is not part of the system and instead has a cheap filter I pick up from the parts stores as needed.

In a cruise mode the engine pulls fumes via the PCV with air coming in from the filter (low pressure, PCV creates the flow). Under high RPM conditions pressure increases, the ball in the PCV sort of just sits in a neutral position and engine vacuum pulls out fumes and excess is vented out through the filter. Most of the time that outward venting is minimal so I've never really seen an issue. This go-round I changed an factor in the equation by over-filling the oil by about 0.5 quarts to aid in starvation prevention.

The outcome of the two events was that I pushed out that excess 0.5 quarts. The cause is still under investigation. Compression test showed 175-190 across the cylinders but cylinder leakdown test showed some less than desirable numbers. I've not had a lot of luck or use for a cylinder leakage tester as there are normally bigger symptoms like CEL or noticeable driveability problems.

The intake is off the car, both hoses coming from the block are hard and broke off during removal even though they are only about 4-5 years old. The vacuum line from the PCV valve to the separator was soft enough to lead me to believe it could collapse under vacuum thus reducing flow.

I've got a few things in mind to combat that but haven't really done any research to see if this was a common problem with the 95 blocks.

The next problem was the car caught on fire... just a lil.... it was nothing really... I mean... seriously, nothing.
So I fixed that and went racing on Monday. Nothing much really to talk about there...
I stayed at a Holiday Inn Express last night, I HAVE to be right.

My Project thread: Here

wickedgoodneon
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Post by wickedgoodneon » Mon Jun 01, 2009 9:48 pm

hey did you get any pics w/ the new R1R's on

Doug95neon
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Post by Doug95neon » Tue Jun 02, 2009 6:37 am

Um, no. But I'll sew what I can do today.
I stayed at a Holiday Inn Express last night, I HAVE to be right.

My Project thread: Here

sullivan
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Post by sullivan » Sun Jun 07, 2009 10:03 pm

car looks awesome!, im guessing those are 16's... and what tire size???

Doug95neon
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Post by Doug95neon » Mon Jun 08, 2009 1:31 pm

215/50R15s actually. Still no pics, been a busy weekend.
I stayed at a Holiday Inn Express last night, I HAVE to be right.

My Project thread: Here

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dawm
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Post by dawm » Wed Jun 10, 2009 8:14 pm

you know you didnt have to slot the tension arm bracket right? there are offset tension arms available.
http://www.neongoodies.com/Goodies/Rear ... Rods.shtml
06 Subaru STI WRB ~ BC Coilovers, Kartboy Bushings
98 Neon R/T 2.4L Turbo Coupe ~ Project car
2007 -Purchased and stripped
2011 -Needs a tune and minor things
02 Neon R/T ~ 08/08/08 -traded for the 07 Caliber R/T (03/14/11 -traded Caliber for STI)
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