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How-To Hockey Puck Engine Mount

Posted: Sun Feb 13, 2011 11:35 pm
by mopar_country
I’m going to show you guys my way of doing the hockey puck front engine mount. This should cost you roughly 10 Dollars to make. Especially if you already have most of the common basic tools. It is a very cost effective modification and works very well. It also is very stiff so I wouldn’t really recommend it on a Daily Driver.

In the picture we have a used stock mount and a hockey puck mount.
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Materials:

- 2 - Standard Hockey Pucks (approx 1$ each)
- 2 - 1” ½ Long, 3/8” Inside Diameter, ½” Outside Diameter steel sleeve (approx 1$ each)
- 2 - ½” I.D., 11/16 or 5/8” O.D. w 1” Flange Bronze Bushings (approx 3$ each)

I picked up the hockey pucks at a local Canadian Tire but you can find these anywhere cheap. The steel sleeves and Bronze Flange bushing I picked up at the local hardware store in the nut/bolts/hardware section.

Here’s a picture of the steel sleeves and bronze flange bushing, 2 pucks and the OEM Bolt.
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Tools:

- 15mm Socket and Ratchet, either ½ or 3/8. I prefer ½
- Bench vise (optional)
- Hammer
- Couple Flat head screw drivers
- Sharp Utility Knife
- Sharp chisel (optional)
- Wire brush or Wire brush for a drill (optional)
- Small Propane Torch (optional but really helps remove the old rubber)
- Garden hose or fire extinguisher (If using the torch, incase of a fire)
- White out pen or paint stick.
- Drill with 1/8, ¼ and ½ drill bits.
- Hacksaw or Dremel with cut-off disks
- Spray lube and other misc tools like pliers and whatnot
- Safety glass and gloves (safety first)

Now that you have your materials and your tools lets get started! Grab your 15mm socket and ratchet and a bit of spray lube, (if you live in salt areas) and remove the 2 bolts and 2 nuts to drop the front mount. Don’t worry about bracing the engine or using a jack to hold it, it wont move or sag when the mount is removed.

Once the mount is removed, use a steady work bench or put it in a vise. Grab your hammer and smack the metal sleeve to knock out most of the bushing. Once its out you can use a sharp knife to cut out some of the rubber that is easy to get at. If your not using a propane torch (You can get a kit with a tank for around 15 bucks) your gonna have to cut out as much of the old rubber as you can. It’s a real pain doing it this way and harder to get the pucks in place if there is a lot left over.
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If your using a Torch. Place the mount in a vise or do it outside near nothing flammable. Light up the torch and start heating the backside of metal sleeve that holds the rubber in place. This will heat up and weaken the adhesive on the rubber making it MUCH EASIER and FASTER to remove.

NOTE: Heat the back evenly and watch the rubber. Once you see a little bit of smoke coming off the rubber the adhesive is burning off. Let it smoke for a couple of seconds and remove it from the flame. Let it sit for a second and use your knife or screwdriver to lift off the rubber. Once you hear the rubber start to “pop” take the heat away. Do this in sections until the rubber is removed. You can clean up the inside later with a wire brush.
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Ok once all the rubber is removed cool down the mount with some water (if used a torch). Clean up the inside with a wire brush. Now grab a puck and put some lube around the edges, this will help it slide in better. Put the mount on its side so you can lay the puck flat to hammer it in. Tap in one puck on one side until it is flush with the mount, Turn it over and repeat for the second puck.
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Now we are getting somewhere but we have to mark the mount to drill it for the sleeves. Take your mount back to the car with the hockey pucks installed. Use just the 2 nuts to hold the mount back in place on the car. Snug them up just to hold it. NOW take your white out pen or paint stick and put it through the hole on the bracket where the bolt goes through. Try to center it the best you can by eye and make a mark on the puck. Should look like this…
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Remove the mount from the car. Place it so the Pucks are flat so you can drill the hole. Start with a 1/8 bit as a pilot hole. Step up to the ¼ then to the ½ bit, Make sure your nice and straight when drilling!

NOTE: This rubber is pretty hard, using a small bit then working up to the right size is easier and makes for a better drilled hole. So now your done with the rubber, time to move on to make the sleeves so we can bolt it back in the car.
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The original funky looking metal sleeve was 2 ¾” Long. We need to cut the sleeves and bronze flanges to the same size so it will fit properly. Im sure there are a 100 different ways to go about this but I thought this way would be cheaper and of half decent quality.
Here is how they will go together .
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Cut 1/8 inch off one end of the 2 metal sleeves. Clean up the shavings and taper the edges for easier fitment later.
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Cut 2mm off the ends of the Bronze Flange bushing. Clean up the edges for better fitment.
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Slide the 2 metal sleeves over the original bolt and put it in the Drilled hole in the Rubber. Apply some lube to help with the installation. Tap on top of the bolt with the handle of your hammer to put them in place, try to center them the best you can.

NOTE: Putting the sleeves in dry may cause one of the pucks to push back out.
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Slide both of the Bronze Flanges with the Washer side against the rubber. This will help even the load.
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Now go test fit it in the car. It should fit just snug in the bracket on the engine. If it doesn’t slide in easy you will have to trim the sleeve/flanges. But if you made your cuts good it should fit in place just fine the first try!

Best way to bolt it back in is using the long 15mm bolt first on the engine, then put the 2 nuts on and the large heavy metal dampner back on last. Hand start all the fasteners before you tighten them up.

Now go for a test drive and enjoy a 10 dollar mount that will last and perform well!

Matt.

*Neither Do I or this Forum take any responsibility in the event of damage or personal injury*