How-To: 1st Gen SRT-4 Turbo kit

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DOHCRT
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How-To: 1st Gen SRT-4 Turbo kit

Post by DOHCRT » Sat Mar 03, 2007 10:10 pm

How-To: 1st Gen SRT-4 Turbo Kit

This how-to is based off of my own install of the SRT turbo. Note that every install will differ slightly in some way, that's the nature of a do-it-yourself project. This is not meant to be a complete step by step article. There are just some things you will have to figure out yourself. No one is going to hold your hand through this. I am in no way responsible for any problems you may have installing or tuning your car. If you blow it up its your own fault. If you die its your own fault. In addition to reading this how-to, you need to do some research and learn a few things.

If your mechanical skills are not that great, or your a little on the lazy side, I recommend purchasing a turbo kit from Hahn Racecraft. Their kits are complete and relatively easy to install. Now on with the how-to.

Generic parts list:

1) SRT-4 turbo (from any year SRT-4 or PT turbo) --> Remember the turbo is one unit with the manifold
2) SRT-4 O2 housing
3) SRT-4 down pipe (stock or after market)
4) SRT-4 Waste Gate Actuator (WGA)
5) SRT-4 Turbo oil feed and return lines
6) SRT-4 Turbo coolant lines
7) Exhaust manifold gasket (I used the SRT-4 gasket)
8) Oil pan gasket
9) High flow, high impedance injectors (Size depends on desired boost level, I used 03 SRT-4 injectors)
10) Fuel Management Unit (FMU) aka RRFPR (there are several different types, you need one that can set "base" fuel pressure)
11) Spoolboy modified fuel canister (recommended)
12) Walbro 255 LPH fuel pump (required)
13) High pressure fuel injection AN hose
14) Various AN fittings
15) Fuel pressure gauge
16) Intercooler (optional, but recommended)
17) Intercooler tubing
18) Missing Link or Map Clamp (some 95's don't need this)
19) Stock PCM (NO Mopar or AFX)
20) Boost gauge
21) Wideband O2 gauge (required)
22) Boost controller (optional,if you don't use one, you will run waste gate pressure)
23) FSM or Haynes manual (required)
24) Some sort of blow-off or diverter valve
25) Motor mount inserts (not required, but you will thank yourself)
26) 1 heat range colder spark plugs

Notes before you start:

It doesn't matter how much boost you want to run. You must do everything listed, even for only 4psi. I would probably limit maximum boost to 8-10psi with the stock bottom end, unless you know what you're doing.

You cant use an SAFC, so don't ask.

If you have a SOHC, you will need an adapter plate for the turbo. You can get one from MattDog if he still sells them.

You must use "premium" fuel. 91 octane or higher is preferred.

I'm sure I missed some parts, so if anyone thinks of any necessary items please PM me.

This parts list assumes you are not using MegaSquirt or any other stand-alone. If you are, you should already know what you need and don't need.

You will find that you need more parts than you think or that I can think of. Allow room for this in your budget.

This how-to is geared towards manual transmission equipped cars, however almost everything applies to automatics. There maybe some fitment issues with an automatic that I am not aware of.

Information pertains to the 2.0L engine. 2.4L installation is very similar.

Acronym Key:

DP = Down Pipe
WGA = Waste gate actuator
BOV = Blow off valve
FMU = Fuel Management Unit
RRFPR = Rising Rate Fuel Pressure Regulator
PCM = Power train Control Module
O2 = Oxygen sensor
MLS = Multi Layer Steel (Gasket)
AN = Army Navy (standard for measuring hose and fittings developed by the Army and Navy)
NPT = National Pipe Thread (pipe thread and size standard)
FSM = Factory Service Manual

AN hose size conversion:
The AN number refers to the hose size in 16ths of an inch (for example; -6 is 6/16ths of an inch, or 3/8ths). Standard hose can be mixed with push-lok fittings, but only for low pressure use.

-4 = 1/4"
-5 = 5/16"
-6 = 3/8"
-8 = 1/2"
-10 = 5/8"

Lets Get Started:

Step 1: Removing Parts

At this point, you need to decide if your engine is in good condition. If the engine will be due for a timing belt soon, now is the time to do it. If the head gasket is questionable or the top end is puking oil, now would be a great time to replace some seals.

-Remove the battery and tray.
-Remove the air intake.
-Remove the catalytic converter.
-Remove the exhaust manifold.
-Remove the oil pressure sending unit.
-Remove the coolant passage plug behind cylinder number two on the back of the engine block.

Step 2: Installing the turbo

-Install the SRT turbo assembly on the cylinder head using a new manifold gasket (I prefer the SRT gasket).
-Torque the bolts to factory SRT specs. You will need to check the tightness of theses bolts after the car has been driven a few times.

Step 3: Attaching the oil and coolant lines

There are a few different ways to do this. I would recommend getting the factory SRT coolant lines and oil return line.

-For the oil feed, you can do one of two things. Use the factory SRT line and either cut and flare it for use with high pressure hose and clamps, or use AN fittings and hose. I went the AN route. You can either attach the hose to where the oil pressure sender was using a 3/8" NPT tee fitting, or if you have a DOHC engine you can take the oil feed from the back of the head using a 1/8" NPT fitting. If you tee of the back of the block, install the oil pressure sender to the tee. All hoses and clamps should be high pressure and oil approved. Do not use worm-gear style hose clamps. You do not need to use an oil restriction, as the turbo incorporates a restriction in the center section.

Image
An oil feed line made from AN fittings and attached to the head.

-Attach the coolant feed line (the top line on the back of the turbo) to one of the heater hoses using a hose barb tee fitting.
-Attach the coolant return line to where the coolant passage plug was behind cylinder two. You can do this by using a 1/4" NPT hose barb fitting.

Image
Coolant return line attached to coolant passage behind cyl.#2. This line was converted to use AN fittings.
You can also see the oil return line. Your oil return should be done similar, even with a stock pan.

-Remove the oil pan. Don't forget to drain the oil.

Drill a hole for the oil return fitting. Place the hole as high as you can in the oil pan. A good spot on aluminum pans is above the drain plug. The size of the hole depends on the fitting you use. The return has to be relatively large. No smaller than -8 AN. I would recommend -10 AN. A simple solution is a -10 AN bulkhead fitting. Use Stat-O-Seals instead of nylon for the bulkhead. An alternative to this would be to weld a -10 bung to the pan. Install the oil pan. Run a 5/8 oil approved hose from the bulkhead to the SRT return fitting on the bottom of the turbocharger. Do not use heater hose. You can use a -10 AN 90 degree Push-Lok hose end to attach the hose to the bulkhead or bung.

Image

Image
Bulkhead with Stat-O-Seals for the oil return line.

-Remember, you have to use thread sealer on all NPT threads.

Step 4: The fuel system

This is the most important part of your turbo install. Ignore this and you will be picking parts of your engine off the road.

We already know the neon's fuel system is returnless. An FMU setup requires a return line. These are the necessary modifications.

-Start by removing the gas tank.
-Remove the fuel pump canister from the tank.
-Install the high flow fuel pump in the canister.
-Perform the Spoolboy mod on the canister. Click here to learn more about the SpoolBoy mod.

Image
A Spoolboy canister on the bottom and a stock canister on top

If your not going to do the Spoolboy mod, figure out how to run a return line back to the tank. Many times you can return fuel to the gas tank filler neck, however, the pump is designed to have fuel returned back to the canister in the neon. There is a lot of debate of weather this method is acceptable or not. I highly recommend doing the Spoolboy mod. I will write the rest of this article assuming you are doing it, but please be aware that there are other options. You must bypass the factory regulator or use an inline booster pump. It is possible to make the factory regulator "unregulated".

From here, you can go a few different ways. You can either run all new fuel lines, or use the factory feed line and run a new return line. Additionally, you can run a new feed line and use the factory feed line as the return line. It doesn't really matter. I chose to use all new -6 AN stainless braided fuel hose and a billet fuel rail, but that is not necessary. If you use the factory line, you must adapt it to the -6 AN hose that comes from the Spoolboy canister. I will assume you will be using the factory feed line. Do some research on the Spoolboy mod and you will be able to determine what to do.

Image
This adapter will allow you to adpat -6 AN to a stock quick connect.

Image
Typical fuel system routing. MS Paint FTW

-Now that you have the canister attached to the feed line, attach the factory hose from the feed line to the fuel rail.
Since you are using the factory fuel rail, there is a port in the middle for attaching a pressure gauge. You will use this port for the return line. Remove the schrader valve from inside the port (very important to do this). The port size is -4 AN. Using a -4 AN hose, attach one end of the hose to the port and the other to the inlet port of the FMU. Each FMU differs in fitting size, so know what yours has. Install a fuel gauge somewhere between the fuel rail and the FMU. Lastly, run a -6 AN hose from the FMU's output to the return port of the Spoolboy canister. Avoid running lines near the turbocharger. Remember that when you do the Spoolboy mod you will need to install an inline fuel filter somewhere between the canister and the fuel rail inlet.

-Install the new fuel injectors. If you are using SRT injectors, you will have to modify the the fuel rail mounts because the SRT injectors are shorter than the neon's injectors. I would not recommend using the stock injectors because your fuel pressure would have to exceed 100psi in boost. Many people find that 36lb injectors work well for low boost on a 2.0L.

Step 5: Intercooler and Down pipe

-If you are using an intercooler, install it now. There are many different options for intercoolers. It is very popular to use the stock SRT intercooler, however there are some fitment issues with the neons A/C condenser. If you are using this intercooler, do some research before you install it. If you are not using the SRT intercooler, I recommend using a same side in/out intercooler. This style makes running the piping easier. You will probably need to remove the front bumper to install the intercooler.

Image
A same side in/out intercooler

-Install the intercooler tubing. There is an interference issue with the shift cables under the turbo's outlet. I ran a 90 degree bend tube off of the outlet. Its very close, but it fits good.

Image
Intercooler installed with tubing.

-Install the SRT O2 housing. Note that the neons stock upstream O2 sensor's wire are not long enough to reach the housing. You will need to lengthen the wires of your O2. DO NOT solder the O2 sensor wires when you lengthen them. Some O2 sensors pull oxygen through one of the wires to compare it to exhaust oxygen. If you solder the wires, it cannot pull oxygen through the solder.

-Now would be a good time to have the wideband O2 sensor bung welded into the DP. You must have this installed upstream of the catalytic converter.

-Attach the SRT down pipe to the O2 housing and the exhaust. This is a direct fit. There is no cutting or welding required if you neon has the stock mid pipe. Install the downstream O2 sensor.

Step 6: Vacuum Lines

-Start by routing the vacuum line for the FMU. This signal should come directly from the intake manifold. You will need to put a check valve in the line so that the FMU does not get a vacuum signal, only boost reference. If the FMU receives a vacuum signal, you will experience drivability issues on the neon. The line should be as direct as possible to the intake manifold.

-Next, run a vacuum line to the WGA. This reference can come from the intake manifold or the compressor housing. If you are using a boost controller, it should be installed somewhere between the reference source and the WGA. If you do not use a boost controller, boost will be limited to WGA pressure. The stock SRT WGA will limit boost to ~4psi without a boost controller. There a 2 nipples on the compressor housing. Use the larger one for the WGA. Put a plug on the smaller one.

-The blow-off valve will require a vacuum and boost signal. Run a line from the intake manifold to the BOV.

-You will need to figure out how you want to do your crankcase ventilation. Catch cans work great. I would recommend using a Toyota Supra turbo PCV valve.

-Finally, install the boost gauge. You can take the signal directly from the manifold, as many boost gauges incorperate a vacuum gauge.

Image
Typical vacuum line routing.

Step 7: Finalizing the Installation and Tuning

Image
A Missing Link (Photo from Synapse Engineering)

-Install the Missing Link or Map clamp on the MAP sensor.
-Install new spark plugs, 1 heat range colder. I would close the gap down to .025" - .030".
-Install the battery. You can either relocate the battery to the trunk, or use a small battery in the engine compartment.
-Install an intake tube and air filter (hint: stock neon intake tube fits great on the turbo). You may have to modify the heater hoses to fit around the intake. Just lengthen them if you need to.
-Fill the engine with fluids if you removed any.
-Verify that everything is tight.
-Prime the fuel system by turning the ignition on and off a few times. Check for fuel leaks!

-You will need to set a base pressure for fuel. This depends on the size of injectors you have. A good base setting for SRT stage 0 injectors is 20 psi. This may be too much, but you always want to start rich when tuning. The smaller the injector, the higher the base pressure must be.

-Start the engine.
-Check for leaks.

The FMU's rate of gain also depends on injector size. 36lb injectors will require around a 4:1 or 6:1 rate of gain. You need to shoot for an 11.0 to 11.5:1 air fuel ratio while in boost. This is only to be safe until the engine is fine tuned.

Fine tuning should be done on a dyno. If you are not experienced with tuning, have a professional do it. The amount of power your engine will produce and how long it lasts greatly depends on its tune.

-Test drive the vehicle and be easy on it.
-Check the fluid levels again.
-I would recommend taking the vehicle to be tuned before driving it hard. You can tune it on the street if you know what you're doing.
-Periodically check the bolts that hold the turbo to the head. They sometimes come loose and need re-torqued.

If you decide to street tune the car, I recommend unplugging the upstream O2 sensor while tuning. This will force the PCM into open loop mode at all times and allow part throttle boost enrichment.




I will be adding to this how-to when I need to. Like I said, if you have any input or find a mistake feel free to PM me. If you need help with the install, I will try to answer as many questions as possible. Please do a lot of research before you attempt a project like this.

Good Luck and have fun

- Jason
Last edited by DOHCRT on Wed May 13, 2009 9:40 pm, edited 8 times in total.
"Losers always whine about their 'best'. Winners go home and fuck the prom queen"

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MattD04SRT4
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Post by MattD04SRT4 » Sun Mar 04, 2007 10:32 am

Wow Jason, very nice write up. How long did the swap take?
2004 SRT 4 - Mopar Stage One - Mopar Lowering Springs - Mopar (Borla) Cat Back Exhaust - Mopar BOV (removed & for sale) - Oil Pressure and Volts Gauge - To be installed in May(maybe sooner depending on the weather): AGP 50 trim W/ race FMIC and all the other goodies


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DOHCRT
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Post by DOHCRT » Sun Mar 04, 2007 12:57 pm

Thanks Matt. It took me a couple of months just because I purchased the parts as I needed them and I didn't have much time to work on it. I wasn't in a rush to finish it. I would say it can be done in a couple of days if you have all the parts.
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Lackof
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Post by Lackof » Sun Mar 04, 2007 1:51 pm

jason is a good man for those turbo buffs out there ;)

good job on the write up

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neonx18
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Post by neonx18 » Sun Mar 04, 2007 9:10 pm

man that write up kicks ass!!! Im almost ready to do mine.
1998 4dr expesso (R.I.P. damn jeep T-boned me
2002 P.O.S.
1997 2dr sport (R.I.P.)
1998 2dr sport (My current project)

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99dohcneon
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Post by 99dohcneon » Thu Mar 08, 2007 4:18 pm

very nice, why is it easier to take the head off?
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99 neon with 2.4 swap w/ 2.0 cams, afx race ecu, 60mm jeep tb, cai, header, polished intake, straight pipe with no muffler, poly. inserts, pt clutch, B&M sts w/booger bushing and skunk2 springs. 14.3 (gtech) 2.5 60 foot :O

'98 neon rt srt swap w/20g turbo ran on MS 18psi Project log
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DOHCRT
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Post by DOHCRT » Thu Mar 08, 2007 4:38 pm

99dohcneon wrote:very nice, why is it easier to take the head off?
You have a lot more access to things you need to get to with the head off. Its especially nice if you have a lot of miles on your head gasket and/or timing belt because you have a great opportunity to replace them.
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Post by 1fast2liter » Thu Mar 08, 2007 6:40 pm

were did you get that nice heat reflecting stuff by the turbo???
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96 blue coupe sold
96 white 4 door sold
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Post by DOHCRT » Fri Mar 09, 2007 4:39 pm

1fast2liter wrote:were did you get that nice heat reflecting stuff by the turbo???
Jegs. Its really nice stuff, I would recommend it to anyone installing a turbo. It has an adhesive backing so you just stick it on. Its relatively inexpensive.
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Post by Jbrown » Sat Mar 10, 2007 1:37 pm

i didnt know we could use an srt4 downpipe on our first gens..... what about this exhaust...u think this would work and clear obd2 inspections? im still trying to find out what that long tube-like thing is coming off the downpipe...i was thinkin its for the downstream o2 :?: .....anyways check it out

http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/03-04-05 ... enameZWDVW
96 Neon SOHC

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DOHCRT
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Post by DOHCRT » Sat Mar 10, 2007 3:25 pm

Jbrown wrote:i didnt know we could use an srt4 downpipe on our first gens..... what about this exhaust...u think this would work and clear obd2 inspections? im still trying to find out what that long tube-like thing is coming off the downpipe...i was thinkin its for the downstream o2 :?: .....anyways check it out
That DP would not pass inspection because it eliminates the catalytic converter. My guess is that the pipe that sticks out the side is for an external waste gate dump. If you are running low boost on a stock engine, just use the factory SRT DP. The catalytic converter is not as restrictive as you may think.
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Post by Jbrown » Sat Mar 10, 2007 8:58 pm

well my block is fully built....i plan on running 12psi daily driven...and bump it up to about 18 or 19 when i go to the track.....
96 Neon SOHC

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Post by das2123 » Wed Mar 14, 2007 2:46 pm

I know alot of people who will be interested in this write-up. Just wanted to say great job!
2003 SRT-4

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Post by Jbrown » Thu Mar 15, 2007 12:43 am

wazaap Das???...i see you made it over this way....
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Post by das2123 » Thu Mar 15, 2007 9:22 am

Jbrown wrote:wazaap Das???...i see you made it over this way....
Sure did.
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